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Monthly Archives : November 2017

Skincare For Cystic Acne

Many people seek a more natural approach to settling cystic nodular acne. Skincare alone, will not settle cystic acne. Neither will dietary changes, nor taking supplements nor essential oils. However, there are more natural alternatives to oral vitamin A and antibiotics to treat moderate to severe, cystic acne. An entirely new blue light activated gel – Kleresca acne treatment.

Skincare for Cystic Acne, however, is essential and mostly the same for all grades of acne. Why? Because the underlying cause of acne is the same and the difference with cystic acne is only the severity and depth. No skin care can penetrate deep enough to impact on the cystic nodular components. So the idea is once the cystic acne is settled with Kleresca to provide skin care to prevent inflammation and acne formation.

Overview of Skincare for Cystic Acne

1.Use an exfoliant, and we do not mean a scrub which can be harsh and irritating. We mean the cosmetic acid exfoliants like AHA’s and BHA’s.
2. Use vitamins A, B & C in skin care. The Anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory benefits of these three skincare essentials. Vitamin A & C also stimulate collagen to assist in skin repair and help prevent scarring.
3. Use sunscreen to help reduce inflammation and prevent scarring.

Skin care for Cystic Acne: Details

1. Exfoliate – to unblock pore obstruction and to encourage skin cell turnover. BHA is the best exfoliant because it is oil soluble and penetrates into the pore to help exfoliate at the site of obstruction. Combinations with AHA especially lactic acid can be useful. Avoid physical scrubs as they can be too harsh.

2. Vitamin A, B & C are core ingredients to help clear and prevent acne.

Vitamin A can come in the form of over the counter retinol or prescription retinoids. They have been shown to decrease cell turnover, helping unblock the obstructed oil glands, to reduce inflammation and may help normalise cellular activity. Prescription vitamin A remains the essential ingredient in skincare for cystic acne. It has the added benefit of assisting healthy collagen growth in repairing the injury from nodular acne, helping reduce acne scarring.

Vitamin B in the form of niacinamide has anti-inflammatory properties that make it useful for all skin types but especially for helping settle inflamed acne.

Vitamin C has antioxidant; anti-inflammatory properties so helps settle acne. Like Vitamin A it has the added benefit of assisting new collagen formation and repair to reduce acne scarring.

The critical thing with skincare for cystic acne is the active ingredients that have been shown to benefit. So seeking out skincare that has the correct percentage, is affordable. We offer some in the clinic. For very detailed information on skin that is prone to acne and the best skincare choices, Dr Lesley Bauman provides in-depth skin typing and ingredients according to your skin type.

A Few Skincare tips for Cystic Acne

Tea Tree Oil

Tea tree oil can help fight cystic acne by applying a drop or two to affected areas. It is well tolerated on the skin and not only helps reduce P. Acnes bacteria but may also be anti-inflammatory.

Avoid Excess Sun Exposure

Although small doses of the sun may have beneficial effects of killing P. Acne, sun exposure creates free radicals and inflammation in the skin. Sun exposure can worsen post-inflammatory pigmentation and acne scarring. Use a sunscreen containing Zinc daily as well as hats and avoid the harsh direct sun in peak sun periods.

2. Ice It

As a temporary measure, which painful cysts are bugging you, apply ice cubes directly for several seconds to help reduce inflammation. The cooling effects of ice can provide welcome, temporary symptomatic relief.

Summary of a More Natural approach To Cystic Acne

Skin care for cystic acne alone, will not settle this painful condition. If you want a more natural approach to settling moderate to severe and cystic acne, there is a bright shining light in Kleresca. A new acne treatment approach using biophotonics (fancy word for fluorescent pulsating light treatment)

Kleresca was recently introduced to Australia as a medical device with impressive results in helping settle all acne, but especially more severe acne of cystic nodular type. With this new treatment, it may be possible to treat up to 90% of acne without antibiotics and oral vitamin A.,

It requires a course of 12 treatments At $200 per treatment or $2000 for a package of 12. We do provide payment plan options to assist you in affordably obtaining the therapy.

Call us on 3350 5447 to book a free assessment with our therapists or email any queries.

Can Reducing Inflammation Clear Your Pimples?

Pimple treatment has traditionally used antibiotics in higher doses and for long periods in an attempt to kill skin bacteria. However, the role of inflammation underlying acne and the importance of settling this in treating and preventing acne is a new field of study. A new biophotonic gel, Kleresca, activated by light, works to reduce skin inflammation and is emerging as a promising alternative to traditional antibiotic and oral vitamin A.

Acne is the most common skin condition which causes significant distress both during the active phases and after pimples settle with post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation and acne scarring.

Acne lesions form when hair follicles become clogged with oil and dead skin cells. This is a perfect environment for overgrowth of bacteria, with Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) being the most common pimple-causing bacteria. It was once believed that pimples and cystic acne were a direct result of inflammation from bacterial infections.

Inflammation Causes Pimples.

Inflammation is the central cause of pimples and cystic acne. And this inflammation is seen in the skin even before a pimple develops. Clogged pores develop inflammation as the sebum is rich in enzymes called matrix metalloproteinases (MMP’s) The bacterial infection then adds further inflammation to form a pimple.

Genetic factors, hormones, stress and high glycemic load foods such as sugar and processed (white) carbs bring on zits because they increase oil production and skin cell turnover and leads to sebum-rich blockage in the pores and an environment for P. acnes to blossom.

Treating inflammation not only helps acne settle but can also help prevent it from developing. It is, in fact, the anti-inflammatory effects of certain antibiotics and not its anti-bacterial effects that are of most benefit in settling acne and preventing acne scarring. Some common antibiotics inhibit the overactivity of the matrix metalloproteinases. So pimple treatment needs to focus on settling inflammation.

The Role of MMP’S Pimple Formation and Inflammation?

Matrix metalloproteinases are enzymes that keep the skin healthy by breaking down old and dying skin structures and building new ones. But when they are overactive they cause damage to the oil gland and cellular matrix (collagen-hyaluronic acid-elastin) with the formation of cystic acne and subsequent acne scarring.

As well as the antibiotics, vitamin A (retinoids) may also act by inhibiting the MMP’s.

Will Acne Settle If The Inflammation is Calmed?

Being able to settle the inflammation will settle the acne and help prevent it.
So what is wrong with the current medical approach? It is not addressing the principal cause – the inflammation. Both conventional higher dose, prolonged antibiotics and retinoids have side effects. Oral retinoids may increase the risk of autoimmune diseases, and antibiotics disrupted gut health and contributed to antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Perhaps it is time to rethink pimple treatment.

Kleresca – A New Pimple Treatment.

An alternative pimple treatment without antibiotics or oral retinoids is Kleresca.
Kleresca acne treatment decreases inflammation, normalise cellular activity and address P Acne infection. Kleresca is an entirely new light-based treatment for acne. It is called a biophotonic treatment. Unlike old light-based treatments for acne (which addressed bacteria with blue light, and inflammation with red light therapy), Kleresca involves the application of gel to the acne affected area. The gel, when activated by light, turning the light into a pulsating fluorescent light, that not only kills the bacteria but penetrates deeper into the dermis to reduce inflammation, normalise cell activity and stimulate healthy skin rejuvenation. (reducing acne scar formation.)

It is a more natural alternative for treatment of cystic acne and moderates to severe acne. And because it helps stimulate new collagen and skin rejuvenation it is not only a acne treatment, it also treats acne scarring.

 

 

1. Suh DH, Kwon HH. What’s new in the physiopathology of acne. BJD 2015 Jan 24. doi: 10.1111/bjd.13634. [Epub ahead of print]
2. Thielitz, A. & Gollnick, H. Topical retinoids in acne vulgaris: update on efficacy and safety. Am. J. Clin. Dermatol. 9, 369–81 (2008)
3. Antoniou, C. & et al. (in press) A multicenter, randomized, split-face clinical trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of chromophore gel-assisted blue light photo-therapy for the treatment of acne. International Journal of Dermatology.

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* DISCLAIMER: Results may vary from person to person.